MOJO20.COM

AN INTERVIEW WITH…CARL BORG

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Over ten years ago I fell completely in love with electronica. A genre with so many different avenues, degrees of experimentation and outcomes in-depth or purpose, it’s a world you can immerse yourself in entirely. For me, my favourite artists were those that kept the tempo down and deliberate, experimenting with sounds and weaving through concepts. One of my favourites for most of the decade has been Sweden’s Carl Borg. Imagine my surprise when I realised that this genius of production was very much a reserved family man, with no real self promotion and was genuinely a lovely guy. We’ve spoke on many occasions but on this occasion we came together to bring you our latest Mojo20.com exclusive interview, enjoy.

Stuart: How’s it going Carl? Where in the world are you right now?



Carl: All good thanks! I live south of Stockholm in a quite hip area called Södermalm. It´s actually the same area where I grew up so it´s nice to be back in the old neighborhood. But it sure is pretty different nowadays..

Stuart: What was it that got you creating music and when was it that you began?



Carl: I think it was around 1994-95 when my mom got her first PC. One of my friends showed me how to use a tracking software called Screamtracker. I was fascinated by what you could do with just a computer, a bunch of samples and a soundcard. I immediately got hooked and started creating tracks as soon as I got free time. I was also active in the so-called demo scene for a few years. Later on I bought an Akai sampler and started to create music more professionally..

Stuart: So I’ve been a fan for around a decade now and was surprised to find that when trying to track down your ‘brand’ on social media it was pretty difficult. Are you on social media except for personally?


Carl: I don´t have an artist facebook page at the moment. Also I just recently started to use Twitter. 🙂
https://twitter.com/carl_aborg
I guess I could use social media more.. It´s a good way to promote yourself, but it is also quite time-consuming. I use Soundcloud a lot and I guess that is social media in a way. I have two accounts, one with the Carl Borg releases and one with commercial projects and film music productions.



https://soundcloud.com/carl-borg


https://soundcloud.com/carl-aborg

Stuart: Are you currently signed to any labels?
Carl: Yeah, I recently released two EPs with downtempo stuff on a german label called Tales from the inside. I also have some other options if I would make something more uptempo/house-influenced as my next release. It sort of all depends on what style i will end up with..
http://talesfromtheinside.com/

Stuart: We’ve not had a new EP since the All Good Things EP in 2014, anything new on the horizon?



Carl: Yeah there will be a new EP at some point in the future. 🙂 I cannot say exactly when, but I have a lot of material that needs to be finished. I´m also working on a new soundtrack album that will be released in the next few months. I did the music for a documentary series called Tasteology, which is a four 20 minute films about the science of food and taste. And now I´m working on a digital release with the music, just like I did with the music from The Next Black.

https://open.spotify.com/album/6o3FcZgPUaKJxqIzXQAjUT

Stuart: We have noticed you feature on various soundtrack compilations, how do these come about and how does it differ to just creating music freely with no template to work off?


Carl: I work at an agency/production house called House of Radon as an in-house music composer and sound designer. They sometimes make longer documentaries that needs a lot of music, and sometimes we decide to make a digital release with the music from the films. It´s quite different from making music freely, as it is almost always a reference track involved with a certain feeling that the director is looking for.

I would say that creating music freely is a bit harder because it relies on an idea that needs to come from yourself. It takes more time to get you started, but it can be a lot more rewarding when you come up with something really interesting.

Stuart: Any thoughts on an LP at any stage in the future?


Carl: I have kind of stopped hoping for an own LP release (except for the soundtrack releases), as I think it would be too much work at this point for me. I´m instead focusing on EPs

Stuart:It’s ten years since ‘The Lektor tapes’ was released under the Stone Forss Borg’ name. How come there was never a follow-up and how did that combination of artists come about in the first place?


Carl: At that time I was playing live together with Forss (Eric Wahlforss) a lot, and we met up with the band leader Nils Berg from the jazz quartet the Stoner at a gig that they had. It turned out he was very interested in collaborating projects and electronic music generally. Together we got an artist grant in Stockholm to make an LP together. The project was an experiment and I think it turned out as an interesting fusion of electronica and jazz. Later on we all decided to go in different ways in life I guess, it was also hard to get the LP finished when there is 6 people involved. 🙂

Stuart: What are you listening to and who are your top tips in the music world right now?

Carl: At the moment I´m really enjoying the music of Bonobo, Bibio, Lindström and Tycho (really looking forward they´re upcoming LP!).

Stuart: Do you have any ambitions in music, or even life generally, that you’re still looking to fulfil?


Carl: It would be nice to work at a proper music studio and/or be able to work more on my own productions as a job. But at the time I´m pretty close to that, and it´s also good to make different kinds of projects as I do now.

Stuart: And finally, where are the bet places to find and hear your music?



I would say Soundcloud is the place to go or Spotify at https://open.spotify.com/artist/1A6tzufDDqCP4qRnReIfhX

Carl Borg (@carl_aborg) was speaking to Mojo20′s Stuart Green (@mojo20_music)

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